Heating With Wood Smoke (DIY Project Download)

heating with wood smoke 1

Numerous studies have shown that wood smoke has the potential to damage our cells, affect our lungs, trigger cancer or even kill us. Wood smoke is the problem, no doubt about it, and is by far the most compelling argument against wood heating. To be fair, the critics do have a point, although their extremism can be off-putting. We found that wood smoke PM has similar toxicity and effects on DNA as that of vehicle exhaust particles, said University of Copenhagen researcher Steffen Loft, who led a new study of air pollution from wood stoves. The researchers analyzed the particulate matter in air samples from a Danish village where most homes were heated by wood-burning stoves, and compared it to background particles in air outside the smoke area.

heating with wood smoke 2Tips on how to reduce smoke from wood heaters. Reducing use of your wood heater or fireplace, particularly on still days, can significantly improve air quality. By taking responsibility for your heater and using it correctly you can minimise the harmful effects of wood smoke pollution in your neighbourhood, create a more efficient fire and also save money on running costs. The health effects of wood smoke exposure include increased respiratory symptoms, increased hospital admissions for lower respiratory infections, exacerbation of asthma, and decreased breathing ability. If you heat your home with wood, the following steps can be taken to minimize the expense, health and environmental effects of indoor wood burning:.

Even the most efficient currently available wood heating appliances are still more polluting than modern heating oil and natural gas appliances. Burning wood produces smoke, and excessive smoke can cause health and other problems for your family and your neighbors. This rather ambitious coverage of firewood, woodheater and wood-smoke issues is dealt with at a level that is intended to avoid purely academic issues and concentrate on practical wood combustion that leads to a better understanding of the appliances, their use and the potential harm wood-smoke can cause. Wood heating is the largest contributor to fine particle (smoke) pollution in our community during the heating season. While wood stove technology has vastly improved, smoke from improper burning can cause unhealthy air quality, especially during periods of air stagnations.

Tips To Reduce Smoke From Your Wood Heater

Their next-door neighbors used to heat their home with wood throughout the entire winter, and the constant smoke that traveled to the O’Link’s home all those years became a nuisance. We found that wood smoke PM has similar toxicity and effects on DNA as that of vehicle exhaust particles, said University of Copenhagen researcher Steffen Loft, who led a new study of air pollution from wood stoves. These are places that are somewhat rural, said Bay Area AQMD spokesperson Aaron Richardson, and there does tend to be a kind of a culture of relying on wood for additional heating needs. People like to heat with wood because it’s a renewable resource, and much less expensive compared to other heating options. As well, while estimates of the amounts differ, using wood produces far less greenhouse gas compared to furnace oil or natural gas. Winter cold has set in, and smoke curls skyward from my neighbor’s chimney. The 11 million American households that heat with wood will be allowed to keep on stoking their polluting stoves. Heating with wood makes sense economically for many households in New Hampshire, the nation’s second most heavily-forested state (after Maine). Although many people enjoy the smell of wood smoke on the winter air, smoke isn’t good for us. Woodheater and Vehicle PM2.5 emissions in Sydney – graphic, right hand column A total of 5457 tonnes of PM2.

Heating With Fire Wood? Burn It Right!

Wood fuel (or fuelwood) is a fuel, such as firewood, charcoal, chips, sheets, pellets, and sawdust. The use of wood as a fuel source for heating is much older than civilization and is assumed to have been used by Neanderthals. Fires were constructed on the ground, and a smoke hole in the top of the tent allowed the smoke to escape by convection.